Bracco Italiano

Italian Pointing Dog, Italian Pointer

His well-developed sense of smell makes him a much appreciated hunting dog. In addition to his great hunting skills, this magnificent dog is an outstanding life companion. He adores his master and the entire household. This fantastic working dog has become one of great beauty, appreciated today as much for his work as for his aesthetics. His somewhat pitiful appearance makes him very lovable and reflects his excellent character.

Height 55 to 67 cm
Weight 25 to 40 kg
Life expectancy 12 to 13 years
Home country Italy

Quick Overview of the Bracco Italiano

Temperament

  • Very patient with children
  • Vigorous and active
  • Calm and quiet
  • Slightly stubborn

Appearance

  • Robust and solid build
  • Noble and harmonious shapes
  • Exudes a beautiful vitality
  • Soft and gentle appearance

Health

  • Solid, hardy and robust
  • Rarely ill
  • Generally healthy

Temperament of the Bracco Italiano

The Bracco Italiano has a sweet and gentle character. Very patient with children, he is only vigorous and active on hunting grounds. He is calm and quiet around his family.

He is slightly stubborn but very easy to train. He learns easily and is naturally sociable. His education is all the more easy.

His stubbornness is light but, as he is very intelligent, his education will make him more docile.

braque italien personnalité

Breed Appearance

Italian braque

The Bracco Italiano is a sturdy and solidly built lively dog whose noble, harmonious shapes leave a beautiful and vigorous impression that exudes vitality. Despite this beautiful vigor, his appearance remains very soft and gentle.

Height

Between 58 and 67 cm (22.83 to 26.38 inches) for the male
Between 55 and 62 cm (21.65 to 24.41 inches) for the female

Weight

Between 25 and 40 kg (55.12 to 88.18 pounds) for the male
Between 25 and 40 kg (55.12 to 88.18 pounds) for the female

Color

His coat varies between white with more or less large orange patches and white with some large brown patches.

Hair

His short coat is dense and rather glossy.

Morphology

His head in the shape of an open arc has a slightly pronounced stop. His oval ochre eyes are wide open. His long ears are perfectly pressed against the cheek. His nose is in harmony with the coat and varies from pink to brown.

According to the FCI breeds nomenclature, this breed belongs to group 7, section 1 and is #202

Price and monthly budget

Price you can expect to pay for a Bracco Italiano puppy: between 1000 € / $ 0 / £0 and 1200 € / $ 0 / £0
These prices are indicative and may vary from breeder to breeder

Tips About this breed

This superb specimen can live anywhere, both indoors and outdoors. Urban or country, he adapts very well to all situations and is suitable for all family conditions.

A large and beautiful niche will enchant him if he lives outdoors, but since he greatly enjoys the company of humans, he will love to join his family for the night in the comfort of his home.

He needs exercise and plenty of space, but to keep him happy, the city dweller should take advantage of every outing to allow him to run.

Health of the Bracco Italiano

Strong and robust, this hardy breed is rarely sick. However, he is voracious and has a tendency to gain weight.

His diet must be monitored and it is imperative to limit his daily rations. He always seems to be "starving to death" and the master must not be moved by his sad and pitiful expression.

With a good, balanced diet in reasonable quantities for his size, he generally enjoys excellent health and very good life expectancy.

GROOMING

His long ears should be inspected regularly and his coat needs a good brushing from time to time. No other special care is necessary for the Bracco Italiano.

History of this breed

Already used in the Middle Ages to hunt birds with nets, the Bracco Italiano is probably the oldest of all European Braques.

Originally from Italy, he is represented on 19th century frescoes confirming his presence at the time. Some of these representations, including Andrea Mantegna's "The Husband's Room" and Paul Saint-Jean's "Young Girl and her Bracco Italiano", depict him at his master's feet or on portraits of wealthier families.

It is even said that dogs closely resembling the Bracco Italiano already existed at the time of Xenophon and in France, at the court of the 15th century kings.

Adapted little by little for gun hunting, he became widespread during the Italian Renaissance. Thanks to the blood supply of Pointers, he became faster and lighter. Differentiated then as two distinct types, they were reunited again in a single standard in 1926.

Used at the time as a hunting dog, he is nowadays greatly appreciated for his beautiful qualities as a companion dog. He combines wonderfully the various functions of a pointing dog on all types of terrain and those of a life companion.

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